Oh FB … You Tease

Don’t you hate a summer cold?
 
I have one. My head is a mess. I can’t breathe without my best friend, Vick’s. Don’t know if that is short for Vicki or Victor, but it is my saving grace these days.
 
Yes, I know. I went off FB. Don’t tell me that you don’t, too.
 
There are times when I have to pull back … disconnect from it. I have hesitated because I feel like I disappoint people when I do that, but the truth is, FB had become a vast consumer of time for me. It managed me … I didn’t manage it.
 
So, in my inimitable way, I said, “Oh shit, I’ve had enough!”
 
I disconnected. Took down my pages and took a break.
 
I had to sneak back on to make sure I had undone my settings, which, in that act, set them up again. And so it went.
 
There are times, especially if I am sick, that I don’t see the point.
 
But there is something about FB that I still have a hard time dealing with.
 
It has the opportunity to be such a great thing. The technology is there. But, to me, it is too often, a vast wasteland.
 
Like so many other things, it seems to me to have gone the way of the lowest common denominator. This platform, connector, is a great opportunity to engage in life and country-changing thought and discourse. And it is mostly used for recipes.
 
I love the little instant recipes, but how many can I look at or make?
 
As a country, we have serious issues that go beyond whether you are in the “Anybody but Trump” camp, or “Anybody but Hillary” camp.
 
Yesterday, I wrote a piece for my blog about reading the Constitution. I also noted that when the Constitution was written, the population of our country was around 4 million. Today, there are more than 320 million.
 
Somewhere between the 4 million and 320-plus million, we have lost our way.
 
Do we, as a people, as a country, know who we are? The tail is wagging the dog.
 
And … our lives matter. They have to matter to us. I swear, that without writing, I feel like I have no voice in this world. The politicians and media are not representing me. I don’t think they are representing you, well, either.
 
And even after a few days, I realized, once again, that life is more fun when it is shared.
 
I listened to a program on NPR, where they discussed friends. Real, honest to grapefruit friends, people say they are your friends, but really aren’t, and even FB friends.
 
I listened to it and went through my list of friends.
 
I have some good friends.
 
The speakers, at first, laughed about FB “friends”. They are and are not real. I got a sick feeling in my stomach as I listened. Most of you, I will never meet, but in a fun, nice way, I see you as my friends.
 
But, when I got home, that is when I decided that maybe my FB “friends” were imaginary, and that I should stop this and live in the real world. (trust me, I do)
 
I still feel that in this world, we need a safe place to be, forgiving place to hang out and even, fail. I fail myself sometimes. I know I probably fail you, too. But that is life. At least, that is my life.
 
Trust me, I am my toughest critic. All I have to offer is what I have in my head and heart. And sometimes, like a turtle, I pull my head back into my shell, until I feel like venturing out.
 
I think you catch my drift.
 
Susan

6 Comments Add yours

  1. Pammy S says:

    I too left FB for about a week for some of the same reasons. I don’t necessarily call my FB “Friends” my friends, but rather acquaintances who have something in common: sort of like the parents of our children’s classmates. We all have children with the same teacher but we don’t necessarily go out for dinner or share our deep feelings with them; but we do serve on committees or smile and say “hi” at school functions.

    I feel breaks from FB are a necessity to reconnect with the real world. In fact, I find myself unfollowing people and trends so that I can only see my friends and family posts. I seem to lose them among the political rants and the recipes!

    As for friends, I know who my friends are. Like the meme says that shows up on FB often (and before that, the countless of emails that were forwarded), Good friends are ones that I can go years without seeing, but I know in my heart they are there!

    Thank you for your insightful writings. You often express the feelings that many of us wish we could!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Susan DeBow says:

      We all need our FB breaks! It is like too much of anything. Fun to check in now and then, but not to stare at!
      Thanks for writing, Pammy

      Like

  2. Anonymous says:

    The flip side~ a GOOD reason to stay connected through is FB is distance. So many friends & family I’d never see if I didn’t have contact through The FB World. I adore seeing photos of places I may never be blessed to travel to~ grandbabies, of the friends I went to high school with. Many of those connections were in the annual Christmas card ~ now I can share their joy & excitement with every milestone. I’d have never known you, if not for a mutual connection via FB~ I clicked over one day~ curiosity sent me reading some of your old posts. You were just starting your adventure in Clover & getting ready to move. How exciting~ you were a native of Norwood, had a dog I was smitten with….so I clicked like & so began our FB friendship~ long before I ever commented on your lampshade Art & where to order the fabric from drawings. I had a new friend~ like a good book, you welcomed me into your World. So, thank you for taking time out of the “real World” to write down your thoughts & share photos here on FB~ it is very much appreciated.

    Like

    1. Susan DeBow says:

      There is definitely that flipside. FB is a tremendous tool. It has great capabilities … it is the users who have to be in charge of what is posted and the time they spend on it. I am so glad you found me. It is very nice to exchange ideas and friendly smiles. I just have to gauge my time and usage. But it is a good place to wear a lampshade on my head. Thank you for commenting.

      Like

  3. Judy says:

    Just look at that picture of roses. Aren’t they amazing? And the smell. (See. You don’t even have to write. Just a photo will elicit a comment. And a memory.) But I do like your words when you share them.

    Like

    1. Susan DeBow says:

      Super, duper. I am glad to post something so delightful. Thank you.

      Like

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