A Drive through York, SC

It used to be that when I thought of the name “York,” I thought of a peppermint patty. But since moving to South Carolina, York has new meaning.

York, South Carolina is not only a town which is our county seat, but it also, the name of the county in which Nick and I now live.

I have been to York the last two mornings. It is a town that got in my mind, and stayed there, since we first visited it nearly twelve years ago.

It is a historical town, dripping with the purple, blue, pink and white flowers of the Crepe Myrtle tree, and from its own history.

As much of our country was, this area was Indian Land. The Catawba Indians lived here. Put until the 1990s, there were still land claims made. Today, there is a Catawba Reservation bot far from here.

The history of York is long and deep, but I am only going to mention a couple of things that I found interesting.

Through the 1920s thru the 1940s, York was the winter home to a few circuses. The Bennett Brothers circus inhabited a block of York. They used the winter months to train the animals and design new shows.IMG_7231

One early drive through York, Nick and I came upon where the Bennett Brothers circus had been housed. The building was so long that I couldn’t get it in one photo.

After the Civil War, many of the businessmen in York, were merchants. Banks and utilities followed.

There had been many cotton plantations, and when the cotton was picked, it was sent down to Charleston, then up to the mills in New England and England to be made into textiles. But after the war, textile mills were built here so that the cotton could be processed.

To me, this area has an aura of history that pervades the air. It tells its stories to me through the great trees and the kind people with the accents that sound as though the summer heat has loosened their vocal cords and taken the tension of like away.

Every place I have been, every city or county office I have had to go to, instead of causing me angst, the people have politely taken care of my business and treated me with such kindness and civility. Their voices have been hospitable.

IMG_7136We are now registered voters in York County. We registered this morning.

After we registered, we drove down the side streets where life was being lived quietly. One man perused his garden. Flags waved from nearly every house. I dreamed a bit. It is hard not to when you are surrounded by such a place.

I have a list of the numbers of our  congressional district, and other information. I think I need to take a 6th grade South Carolina history class.

Or, as I probably will, I will ride around and talk to people and get a feel for a place that words on the internet can’t give.

Reporting, mostly live …

Susan

It used to be that when I thought of the name “York,” I thought of a peppermint patty. But since moving to South Carolina, York has new meaning.

York, South Carolina is not only a town which is our county seat, but it also, the name of the county in which Nick and I now live.

I have been to York the last two mornings. It is a town that got in my mind, and stayed there, since we first visited it nearly twelve years ago.

It is a historical town, dripping with the purple, blue, pink and white flowers of the Crepe Myrtle tree, and from its own history.

As much of our country was, this area was Indian Land. The Catawba Indians lived here. Put until the 1990s, there were still land claims made. Today, there is a Catawba Reservation bot far from here.

The history of York is long and deep, but I am only going to mention a couple of things that I found interesting.

Through the 1920s thru the 1940s, York was the winter home to a few circuses. The Barnett Brothers Circus inhabited a block of York. They used the winter months to train the animals and design new shows.

One early drive through York, Nick and I came upon where the Barnett Brothers circus had been housed. The building was so long that I couldn’t get it in one photo.

After the Civil War, many of the businessmen in York, were merchants. Banks and utilities followed.

There had been many cotton plantations, and when the cotton was picked, it was sent down to Charleston, then up to the mills in New England and England to be made into textiles. But after the war, textile mills were built here so that the cotton could be processed.

To me, this area has an aura of history that pervades the air. It tells its stories to me through the great trees and the kind people with the accents that sound as though the summer heat has loosened their vocal cords and the tension as melted away.

Every place I have been, every city or county office I have had to go to, instead of causing me angst, the people have politely taken care of my business and treated me with such kindness and civility. Their voices have been hospitable.

We are now registered voters in York County. We registered this morning.

After we registered, we drove down the side streets where life was being lived quietly. One man perused his garden. Flags waved from nearly every house. I dreamed a bit. It is hard not to when you are surrounded by such a place.

I have a list of the numbers of our congressional district, and other information. I think I need to take a 6th grade South Carolina history class.

Or, as I probably will, I will ride around and talk to people and get a feel for a place that words on the internet can’t give.

Reporting, mostly live …

Susan

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Teresa Donley says:

    Wow! Look at those houses! Just beautiful.

    Like

    1. Susan DeBow says:

      They are lovely, aren’t they. Real homes with real people. Thank you, Teresa.

      Like

  2. Sandra Ingram says:

    I love the pictures of the big homes with the wrap around porches. I love a big porch to sit on.

    Like

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